An analysis of political religious and economic purposes in major historical wars

Podcasts Myth of the Religious Wars For generations there has endured a certain liberal narrative of European history which would have us believe that the establishment of the Christian commonwealth Christendom is an inherently oppressive concept that leads only to repression and killing in the name of religion. To establish this point, the bugbear of the age of the religious wars is trotted out, and it is put forward as a simple fact of history that Europeans once killed each other by droves over minutiae of religion. The French Wars of Religion and the St. These frightening episodes are supposed to be what liberal democracy "saved" us from, and thus provide the justification for the strict separation of Church and State found in most modern constitutions.

An analysis of political religious and economic purposes in major historical wars

The BBC external service had a difficult time with its own government when it included negative press comment on the British role in the Suez Crisis.

Whereas the study of international relations in the newly founded Soviet Union and later in communist China was stultified by officially imposed Marxist ideologyin the West the field flourished as the result of a number of factors: The traditional view that foreign and military matters should remain the exclusive preserve of rulers and other elites yielded to the belief that such matters constituted an important concern and responsibility of all citizens.

This increasing popularization of international relations reinforced the idea that general education should include instruction in foreign affairs and that knowledge should be advanced in the interests of greater public control and oversight of foreign and military policy.

This new perspective was articulated by U. The extreme devastation caused by the war strengthened the conviction among political leaders that not enough was known about international relations and that universities should promote research and teaching on issues related to international cooperation and war and peace.

International relations scholarship prior to World War I was conducted primarily in two loosely organized branches of learning: Involving meticulous archival and other primary-source research, diplomatic history emphasized the uniqueness of international events and the methods of diplomacy as it was actually conducted.

International law —especially the law of war—had a long history in international relations and was viewed as the source of fundamental normative standards of international conduct. The emergence of international relations was to broaden the scope of international law beyond this traditional focal point.

Between the two world wars During the s new centres, institutes, schools, and university departments devoted to teaching and research in international relations were created in Europe and North America.

In addition, private organizations promoting the study of international relations were formed, and substantial philanthropic grants were made to support scholarly journals, to sponsor training institutes, conferences, and seminars, and to stimulate university research.

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Three subject areas initially commanded the most attention, each having its roots in World War I. During the revolutionary upheavals at the end of the war, major portions of the government archives of imperial Russia and imperial Germany were opened, making possible some impressive scholarly work in diplomatic history that pieced together the unknown history of prewar alliancessecret diplomacyand military planning.

These materials were integrated to provide detailed explanations of the origins of World War I. There also were extensive memoirs and volumes of published documents that provided much material for diplomatic historians and other international relations scholars.

The newly created League of Nationswhich ushered in the hope and expectation that a new and peaceful world order was at hand, was a second subject that captured significant attention.

An encyclopedia of philosophy articles written by professional philosophers.

Some of the international relations schools that were founded in the interwar period were explicitly created to prepare civil servants for what was expected to be the dawning age of international government. Accordingly, intensive study was devoted to the genesis and organization of the league, the history of earlier plans for international federations, and the analysis of the problems and procedures of international organization and international law.

The third focal point of international relations scholarship during the early part of the interwar period was an offshoot of the peace movement and was concerned primarily with understanding the causes and costs of war, as well as its political, sociological, economic, and psychological dimensions.

In the s the breakdown of the League of Nations, the rise of aggressive dictatorships in Italy, Germany, and Japanand the onset of World War II produced a strong reaction against international government and against peace-inspired topics in the study of international relations.

The moral idealism inherent in these topics was criticized as unrealistic and impractical, and the academic study of international relations came to be regarded as the handiwork of starry-eyed peace visionaries who ignored the hard facts of international politics.

In particular, scholars of international relations were criticized for suggesting standards of international conduct that bore little resemblance to the real behaviour of nations up to that time.

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As the desired world of peaceful conflict resolution and adherence to international law grew more distant from the existing world of aggressive dictatorships, a new approach to the study of international relations, known as realismincreasingly dominated the field.

Nevertheless, the scholarly work on world affairs of the early interwar period, despite the decline in its reputation and influence, was extensive and sound, encompassing the collection and organization of large amounts of important data and the development of some fundamental concepts.

Some topics of study in international relations that are still considered novel or of recent origin were already being vigorously explored in the interwar period. Indeed, a brief review of these topics tends to undermine the image of the interwar period as one dominated by moralistic ideas.

Although these earlier studies tended to be somewhat short on theory and long on description, most of the topics examined remain relevant in the 21st century. The scholarly contributions of some individuals in the s were particularly noteworthy because they foreshadowed the development of international relations studies after World War II.

Lasswellfor example, explored the relationships between world politics and the psychological realm of symbols, perceptions, and images; Abram Kardiner and his associates laid the groundwork for an approach, based on a branch of anthropology known as culture-and-personality studiesthat later became a popular but short-lived theory of international relations; Frederick L.

Schuman, setting a style that is still followed by interpreters of foreign policy and by journalists, synthesized analytic commentary with accounts of current international events; Quincy Wright investigated numerous aspects of international behaviour and war as head of one of the first team research projects in international relations; and E.

CarrBrooks Emeny, Carl J. In the Spanish poet, historian, philosopher, and diplomat Salvador de Madariagafounder of the College of Europe, relied upon his experience in working with the League of Nations Secretariat in Geneva to describe the gap between what was being said or written about international relations and what was actually happening.

The broadened definition and scope of the study of international relations were among the fundamental contributions of scholars of the interwar period. Many of these innovators were enlisted by governments during World War II for work in intelligence and propagandaas well as other aspects of wartime planning.The Wuhan Gang & The Chungking Gang, i.e., the offsprings of the American missionaries, diplomats, military officers, 'revolutionaries' & Red Saboteurs and the "Old China Hands" of the s and the herald-runners of the Dixie Mission of the s.

This article indicates that comparative historical analysis is complementary to statistical analysis because it deals with ‘causes of effects’ rather than ‘effects of causes’.

It also presents some ideas about how one can tackle the problems posed by engaging in comparative historical inquiry. In addition, the article argues that comparative-historical .

An analysis of political religious and economic purposes in major historical wars

Some historians argue that what is termed "religious wars" is a largely "Western dichotomy" and a modern invention from the past few centuries, (economic or political) Jews make a religious and historical claim to the land, and Palestinians make historic, religious and ethnic claims to the land.

Pre-Social Security Period. Traditional Sources of Economic Security. All peoples throughout all of human history have faced the uncertainties brought on by . Progress is the idea that advances in technology, science, and social organization can produce an improvement in the human condition, and therefore that entire societies, and humanity in general, can improve in terms of their social, political, and economic benjaminpohle.com may happen as a result of direct human action, as in social enterprise or through activism, or as a natural part of.

In more technical terms, historical context refers to the social, religious, economic, and political conditions that existed during a certain time and place.

Basically, it's all the details of the time and place in which a situation occurs, and those details are what enable us to interpret and analyze works or events of the past, or even the.

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