An analysis of poor african american woman celie in the color purple by alice walker

The girl closely resembles Celie, especially her eyes.

An analysis of poor african american woman celie in the color purple by alice walker

The Characters

It primarily talks about the story of Celie, a poor, barely literate Southern black woman who struggles to escape the brutality of her treatment by men. The tale is told primarily through her own letters, which, out of seclusion and anguish, she initially addresses to God.

As a teen-ager she is repetitively raped and beaten by her stepfather, then forced by him into loveless marriage to Albert, a widower with four children. To Albert, who is in love with lively and decisively independent blues singer named Shug Avery, Celie is merely a servant and an occasional sexual convenience.

The novel begins in the early 's and ends in the mid's. Celie frees herself from her husband's suppressive control. Celie eventually leaves Albert and moves to Memphiswhere she starts a business designing and making clothes. Paradoxically, it is Albert's real love and sometime mistress, Shug Avery, and his rebellious daughter-in-law, Sofia, who provide the poignant support for Celie's personal evolution.

An analysis of poor african american woman celie in the color purple by alice walker

And, in turn, it is Celie's new understanding of an acceptance of herself that eventually lead to Albert's re-examination of his own life. Walker explores the separation of men and women through a triangular love affair.

It is Shug Avery who forces Albert to stop brutalizing Celie, and it is Shug with whom Celie first consummates a satisfying and reciprocally loving relationship.

The Color Purple Analysis - benjaminpohle.com

What makes Miss Walker's exploration so lastingly affecting is the choice of a narrative style that, without the interference of the author, forces intimate acknowledgment with the heroine.

Initially, some readers may be put off by Celie's keyhole view of the world, particularly since her letters are written in a dialect and from the perspective of a naive, uneducated teenager. As the novel progresses, however, and as Celie grows in experience, her observations become sharper and more informed; the letters take on authority and the dialect, once accepted, assumes a lyrical cadence of its own.

Most prominent theme is the division and violence that mark the relationships between Miss Walker's black men and women.

At that point, the strongly felt need for a more open inspection of black life led writers to challenge longstanding black middle-class proscriptions against dramatizing and thereby exposing anything that might reinforce damaging racial stereotypes.

In "The Color Purple" the role of male dominance in the frustration of black women's struggle for independence is clearly the focus. The collective effect is that the novel is persuasive because of the genuineness of its folk voice.

An analysis of poor african american woman celie in the color purple by alice walker

And, scrumptiously, it is not just the two narrator correspondents who come vividly alive in this tale. A number of memorable female characters come into view.

The Color Purple by Alice Walker sheds light on the hardships of Celie’s life as an African American woman in the early nineteenth century through letters and prayers written by Celie herself. Soon after birth Celie’s mother dies, and only Celie, her father, and her sister Nettie remain. A summary of Letters 1–10 in Alice Walker's The Color Purple. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Color Purple and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. As a poor African-American woman in rural Georgia in the s and a victim of domestic. The Color Purple is a epistolary novel by American author Alice Walker which won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Award for Fiction. [1] [a] It was later adapted into a film and musical of the same benjaminpohle.com: Alice Walker.

There is Shug Avery, whose pride, independence and craving for living act as a catalyst for Celie and others. And Sofia, whose mutinous spirit leads her not only to desert her overbearing husband but also to challenge the social order of the racialist community in which she lives.

If there is a weakness in this novel - besides the somewhat pale portraits of the males - it is Netti's correspondence for Africa. While Netti's letters widen and emphasize the theme of female oppression by describing customs of the Olinka tribe that parallel some found in the American South, they are often mere monologues on African history.

After Celie's extremely subjective voice has been established, they seem monotonous and intrusive. The Color Purple is not an easy book to read as it is not written in the style of most novels.

Walker does not tell us everything about the characters and the setting and why the characters behave as they do. The series of letters in this novel aren't dated, in order to have a time frame for the novel.

We will have to read through it cautiously, watching for clues about social attitudes, clothes, and other telling details. Only after completing the book do we understand that the letters begin in a time when people ride around in wagons, and when the letters end, people are driving cars.

Thus, the time span of the novel is about forty years. In addition, we realize that there are large gaps between letters, sometimes five years, but this information is not revealed by Walker herself.

We gather this information from clues in the letters and by comparing letters. Walker does not write as an omniscient narrator, filling in the gaps and giving us background.

We must rely on our own close reading and on the particulars that the women who write the letters Celie and her sister Nettie give us. There is yet another intricacy in reading this novel. We begin with Celie's letters and we come across a language problem.Celie's Growth in The Color Purple by Alice Walker The Color Purple is an award-winning novel written by Alice Walker.

Originally published in , the novel tells about a black woman's life struggles. A summary of Letters 1–10 in Alice Walker's The Color Purple. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Color Purple and what it means.

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Aug 29,  · critical analysis of the novel “the color purple” " The Color Purple " is regarded as Walker 's most successful and critically acclaimed benjaminpohle.com primarily talks about the story of Celie, a poor, barely literate Southern black woman who struggles to escape the brutality of her treatment by men.

The Color Purple is a epistolary novel by American author Alice Walker which won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Award for Fiction.

[1] [a] It was later adapted into a film and musical of the same benjaminpohle.com: Alice Walker. The Varying Experiences of African American Women in Alice Walker’s The Color Purple Applied to Feminist and Queer Literary Theory Alice Walker's The Color Purple is a novel that applies the epistolary technique to convey historical and contemporary African American female issues.

The Color Purple by Alice Walker, epitomizes African American society, female freedom, and female friendship through brutal scenes told by Celie, a young African American woman. Accurately capturing the limits of black women within the social structure, The Color Purple should not be banned.

SparkNotes: The Color Purple: Letters 1–10, page 2